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Healthy Vision Month

Taking care of your vision is a health priority similar to eating well and exercising. Your vision keeps you safe and allows you to experience the beauty of the world. Despite the importance of maintaining one’s eye health, Optometrists are often challenged with educating the public on the necessary steps to take care of their eyes. The need for proper eye care education has developed into Healthy Vision Month, a reminder every May from the optometry community to take the necessary steps to ensure your vision remains healthy for the years to come. In this article, we’ll discuss the benefits of receiving regular comprehensive eye exams and other health strategies that will benefit and protect your eyes.

Comprehensive eye exams performed by an optometrist are an essential component of taking care of your eye health and vision. Your optometrist will discuss your family’s health history with you, screen for your vision quality, and perform tests to evaluate your eye health. It is recommended for a healthy adult to receive a comprehensive eye exam once every two years. Bi-annual eye exams ensure that your vision is accurate and that you’re not at risk of an eye condition. The early detection of eye diseases is essential for effective treatment, as timely treatment will result in better outcomes.

Some special considerations for examination frequency include:

  • Those that have refractive errors and need glasses or contact lenses should receive an eye exam annually. Annual eye exams will ensure one’s prescription is up to date.
  • Infants and Children should receive their first eye exams between 6-12 months old, 3-5 years old, and just before they enter kindergarten. Healthy vision in children is important for their learning and early development.
  • Those over the age of 65 should receive an eye exam annually. Aging makes one more vulnerable to eye conditions, such as Glaucoma and Age-related Macular Degeneration. It is important to detect eye conditions quickly before they can irreversibly claim one’s vision.

Outside of the optometrist’s office, your health habits play an important role in determining your overall eye health. Here are some healthy strategies to improve your eye health and avoid eye-related injuries.

  • You should eat well to ensure you’re eyes receive proper nutrition. Some eye-health foods include dark leafy greens such as kale, collard greens, and spinach for their vitamin content and fish such as salmon, tuna, and trout for their omega-3 fatty acid content.
  • Physical exercise and maintaining a healthy weight are necessary steps in assuring your eyes are healthy. Physical exercise increases blood flow to the eyes and lowers intraocular pressure. Maintaining a healthy weight lowers the risk of eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma.
  • You should quit smoking or never start to protect your eye health. Smoking increases the prevalence of eye conditions, such as dry eye and blurry vision, as well as eye diseases. Quitting smoking will improve the damage caused by smoking.
  • You should wear eye protection when performing yard or housework. Every year, there are thousands of emergency room visits due to eye injuries sustained from chemicals in household cleaners and debris from yard work.
  • The blue light emitted from computer screens, smartphones, and other electronic devices are responsible for dry eyes, blurry vision, and eye fatigue. That’s why it’s important to take regular breaks when working on the computer. The 20-20-20 rule recommends that every 20 minutes, one should look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

 

Daily vs. Monthly Contact Lenses: Which are right for you?

Consumers have an overwhelming number of options when choosing the right contact lens for their unique vision needs. One of the most important considerations when selecting a contact lens is, “should I purchase daily or monthly contact lenses?”. Each of these lens types has its benefits and drawbacks. After learning the nuances between each lens, you will be well-equipped to make the right purchasing decision.

Monthly contact lenses used to be the standard when contact lenses first hit the consumer market. They are designed to be worn each day for about 30 days before they need to be discarded. The lenses are taken out every night and need to be stored in a cleaning solution. Monthly contacts are thicker and more durable than their daily counterparts.

Daily contact lenses come in blister packs and are designed to be discarded every day after use. Their disposable nature means they do not require cleaning. Daily contacts are lighter and more comfortable compared to monthly contact lenses.

Benefits vs. Costs

We’ll compare the benefits and costs between daily and monthly contacts by their fundamental differences.

Convenience

  • Daily contacts require no cleaning and are less likely to be overworn. Their replaceability makes them great for active lifestyles, where getting dirt in your eye can be fixed by simply replacing the contact lens.
  • Daily contacts are not safe to sleep in. Wearing daily contacts to bed will put you at risk for an eye infection. Monthy contacts, on the other hand, are safer to leave in at night.

Comfort

  • Daily contacts are thinner, which is conducive to reduced dryness and irritation on the eyes, as there’s increased oxygen permeability and water content.

Cost

  • Daily contacts are costlier upfront than monthly contacts. Those who wear contacts every day will spend more money overall on daily contacts.
  • Daily contacts can be cheaper for those that have light prescriptions and wear contacts infrequently.

Construction

  • Monthly contacts are more durable than daily contacts. The increase in lens density allows monthly contacts to be available in higher prescriptions.
  • Although monthly contacts are more durable than daily contacts, monthly contacts run the risk of over-wearing due to their longer use time.

Eco-Friendly

  • Monthly contacts are less wasteful than daily contacts, as they are disposed of less frequently. Throwing out old lenses has an accumulative effect; monthly contacts are thrown out about 12 times compared to every day with daily contacts!

Which One Should You Choose?

The decision of which contact is best ultimately resides on what your unique needs are. Talk to your optometrist for recommended brands based on your prescription and lifestyle.

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Technology – Advanced Eye Care

We use the most up-to-date technology to ensure the best eye care possible. Here are some of the different types of tests and equipment you may experience on a visit to our Practice.

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Corneal Mapping

Corneal topography, also known as photokeratoscopy or videokeratography, is a non-invasive medical imaging technique for mapping the surface curvature of the cornea, the outer structure of the eye. Since the cornea is normally responsible for some 70% of the eye’s refractive power, its topography is of critical importance in determining the quality of vision.

The three-dimensional map is therefore a valuable aid to the examining ophthalmologist or optometrist and can assist in the diagnosis and treatment of a number of conditions; in planning refractive surgery such as LASIK and evaluation of its results; or in assessing the fit of contact lenses. A development of keratoscopy, corneal topography extends the measurement range from the four points a few millimeters apart that is offered by keratometry to a grid of thousands of points covering the entire cornea. The procedure is carried out in seconds and is completely painless.

Icare Tonometer

We use the latest technology to check your eye pressure, without needing drops or a puff of air.

Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)

We use cutting-edge digital imaging technology to assess your eyes. Many eye diseases, if detected at an early stage, can be treated successfully without total loss of vision. Your retinal Images will be stored electronically. This gives the eye doctor a permanent record of the condition and state of your retina.

This is very important in assisting your Optometrist to detect and measure any changes to your retina each time you get your eyes examined, as many eye conditions, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration are diagnosed by detecting changes over time.

An Optical Coherence Tomography scan (commonly referred to as an OCT scan) is the latest advancement in imaging technology. Similar to ultrasound, this diagnostic technique employs light rather than sound waves to achieve higher resolution pictures of the structural layers of the back of the eye.

A scanning laser used to analyze the layers of the retina and optic nerve for any signs of eye disease, similar to an CT scan of the eye. It works using light without radiation, and is essential for early diagnosis of glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinal disease.

With an OCT scan, doctors are provided with color-coded, cross-sectional images of the retina. These detailed images are revolutionizing early detection and treatment of eye conditions such as wet and dry age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy.

An OCT scan is a noninvasive, painless test. It is performed in about 10 minutes right in our office. Feel free to contact our office to inquire about an OCT at your next appointment.

Retinal Photography Technology

Annual eye exams are vital to maintaining your vision and overall health. We offer a Retinal Exam as an important part of our eye exams. The Retinal Exam produces an image that is as unique as you fingerprint and provides us with a wide view to look at the health of your retina. The retina is the part of your eye that captures the image of what you are looking at, similar to film in a camera.

Many eye problems can develop without you knowing. You may not even notice any change in your sight. But, diseases such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, retinal tears or detachments, and other health problems such as diabetes and high blood pressure can be seen with a thorough exam of the retina.

A Retinal Exam provides:

  • A scan to show a healthy eye or detect disease.
  • A view of the retina, giving your doctor a more detailed view than he/she can get by other means.
  • The opportunity for you to view and discuss the image of your eye with your doctor at the time of your exam.
  • A permanent record for your file, which allows us to view your images each year to look for changes.

A Retinal Exam is fast, easy, and comfortable for all ages. To have the exam, you simply look into the device one eye at a time and you will see a comfortable flash of light to let you know the image of your retina has been taken. The image is shown immediately on a computer screen so we can review it with you.

Please schedule your Retinal Exam today!

What to Expect

Preparing for Your Eye Exam In Buffalo Grove

Person wearing glasses reading before an eye doctor's appointment

You might be going to a regularly-scheduled eye exam. You may be following a recommendation to see an optometrist after a vision screening at a local clinic or wellness center. Or your next eye doctor visit could be a response to vision problems or eye discomfort.

The more you know going in, the easier the entire vision care process will be.

For regularly scheduled eye exams, expect to talk about any changes in your medical history since the last time you saw your eye doctor. And if this is your first time in a new practice, you’ll be asked to provide a more complete medical history, including a list of medications you’re currently taking, and any vision problems your parents may have experienced.

In addition, you’ll undergo a series of vision and eye tests that help determine the overall health and quality of your vision. These tests also help to check that your current prescription glasses or contacts (if you have one) is still meeting your vision needs. Your optometrist will also check your eyes for signs of any potential vision problems or eye diseases. In many instances, your pupil may be dilated (opened) using special drops so that your eye doctor can better see the structures of the eye.

You’ll then have an honest discussion about the current state of your eye health and vision, and your eye doctor may prescribe vision correction for you in the form of eyeglasses or contact lenses. Any health concerns or possibly serious vision complications will also be discussed, including the next steps you must take to preserve and protect your sight.

How Long Is an Eye Exam?

In general, a routine eye exam will last less than an hour depending upon the number of tests you have, and may be partially or completely covered by many vision insurance plans.

Visiting eye doctors as a result of a vision screening is also common, but remember: vision screenings offered by health clinics, pediatricians, public schools or local charitable organizations are not a substitute for comprehensive eye exams. Be sure to bring the findings from your screening to your eye doctor—it’s a great way to begin the discussion of your current eye health.

For eye doctor visits that result from eye pain, eye discomfort or vision problems you actually can see, expect to take many of the steps involved in a routine eye exam, but specific to the symptoms you’re having. There may be a number of additional tests required as well, so it’s important—especially when suffering pain or discomfort—to allow for as much time as possible for a complete, comprehensive eye exam.

And if you feel you are in an emergency situation with your eyes or your vision—don’t wait. Seek immediate emergency medical treatment.

What to Remember For Your Eye Exam

Many vision problems and eye diseases often present minimal, if any, symptoms. That’s why it’s so important to make regular appointments to see your eye doctor. And since vision can change gradually over time, it’s important to know that you’re seeing your best, year after year.

Remember the following for your next eye exam:

  • Know your medical history and list of current medications
  • Know your current symptoms and be able to describe them—write them down if necessary
  • Know your family history—some eye diseases like glaucoma and cataracts are hereditary
  • Ask in advance about your particular vision insurance plan, and if a co-pay will be due
  • Bring your insurance card, identification and method of payment, if necessary
  • Bring your most recent prescription for glasses or contact lenses
  • Bring your corrective eyewear to the exam
  • If undergoing a test using dilation eye drops, bring proper eye protection, like sunglasses, for after your appointment

Most importantly, remember that eye doctors — and everyone within the eye care practice — are there to help you see your best and feel your best.

Special thanks to the EyeGlasses Guide, for information material that aided in the creation of this website.

You can contact our office at your convenience to schedule your next eye doctor’s appointment.

Contact Lens Exams

Eye Exams for Contact Lenses

Man smiling wearing contact lenses

Contact lenses are a great alternative to wearing eyeglasses. An often unknown fact is that not all patients wear contact lenses as their primary source of vision correction. Each patient is different, with some patients wearing contact lenses only on weekends, special occasions or just for sports. That is the beauty of contact lens wear, the flexibility it gives each individual patient and their lifestyle.

If you decide to opt for contact lens wear, it is very important that the lenses fit properly and comfortably and that you understand contact lens safety and hygiene. A contact lens exam will include both a comprehensive eye exam to check your overall eye health, your general vision prescription and then a contact lens consultation and measurement to determine the proper lens fit.

The Importance of a Comprehensive Eye Exam

Whether or not you have vision problems, it is important to have your eyes checked regularly to ensure they are healthy and that there are no signs of a developing eye condition. A comprehensive eye exam will check the general health of your eyes as well as the quality of your vision. During this exam the eye doctor will determine your prescription for eyeglasses, however this prescription alone is not sufficient for contact lenses. The doctor may also check for any eye health issues that could interfere with the comfort and success of contact lens wear.

Hard To Fit Contact Lens Patients

Even if you’ve been told you can’t wear contact lenses, we may be able to help. Specialty contacts are available for patients with dry eyes, severe astigmatism and more.

The Contact Lens Consultation

The contact lens industry is always developing new innovations to make contacts more comfortable, convenient and accessible. Therefore, one of the initial steps in a contact lens consultation is to discuss with your eye doctor some lifestyle and health considerations that could impact the type of contacts that suit you best.

Some of the options to consider are whether you would prefer daily disposables or monthly disposable lenses, as well as soft versus rigid gas permeable (GP) lenses. If you have any particular eye conditions, such as astigmatism or dry eye syndrome, your eye doctor might have specific recommendations for the right type or brand for your optimal comfort and vision needs.

Now is the time to tell your eye doctor if you would like to consider colored contact lenses as well. If you are over 40 and experience problems seeing small print, for which you need bifocals to see close objects, your eye doctor may recommend multifocal lenses or a combination of multifocal and monovision lenses to correct your unique vision needs.

Contact Lens Fitting

One size does not fit all when it comes to contact lenses. Your eye doctor will need to take some measurements to properly fit your contact lenses. Contact lenses that do not fit properly could cause discomfort, blurry vision or even damage the eye. Here are some of the measurements your eye doctor will take for a contact lens fitting:

Corneal Curvature

In order to assure that the fitting curve of the lens properly fits the curve of your eye, your doctor will measure the curvature of the cornea or front surface of the eye. The curvature is measured with an instrument called a keratometer to determine the appropriate curve for your contact lenses. If you have astigmatism, the curvature of your cornea is not perfectly round and therefore a “toric” lens, which is designed specifically for an eye with astigmatism, would be fit to provide the best vision and lens fit. In certain cases your eye doctor may decide to measure your cornea in greater detail with a mapping of the corneal surface called corneal topography.

Pupil or Iris Size

Your eye doctor may measure the size of your pupil or your iris (the colored area of your eye) with an instrument called a biomicroscope or slit lamp or manually with a ruler or card. This measurement is especially important if you are considering specialized lenses such as Gas Permeable (GP) contacts.

Tear Film Evaluation

One of the most common problems affecting contact lens wear is dry eyes. If the lenses are not kept adequately hydrated and moist, they will become uncomfortable and your eyes will feel dry, irritated and itchy. Particularly if you have dry eye syndrome, your doctor will want to make sure that you have a sufficient tear film to keep the lenses moist and comfortable, otherwise, contact lenses may not be a suitable vision option.

A tear film evaluation is performed by the doctor by putting a drop of liquid dye on your eye and then viewing your tears with a slit lamp or by placing a special strip of paper under the lid to absorb the tears to see how much moisture is produced. If your tear film is weak, your eye doctor may recommend certain types of contact lenses that are more successful in maintaining moisture.

Contact Lens Trial and Prescription

After deciding which pair of lenses could work best with your eyes, the eye doctor may have you try on a pair of lenses to confirm the fit and comfort before finalizing and ordering your lenses. The doctor or assistant would insert the lenses and keep them in for 15-20 minutes before the doctor exams the fit, movement and tearing in your eye. If after the fitting, the lenses appear to be a good fit, your eye doctor will order the lenses for you. Your eye doctor will also provide care and hygiene instructions including how to insert and remove your lenses, how long to wear them and how to store them if relevant.

Follow-up

Your eye doctor may request that you schedule a follow-up appointment to check that your contact lenses are fitting properly and that your eyes are adjusting properly. If you are experiencing discomfort or dryness in your eyes you should visit your eye doctor as soon as possible. Your eye doctor may decide to try a different lens, a different contact lens disinfecting solution or to try an adjustment in your wearing schedule.

Contact us today to schedule your contact lens exam and fitting.

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Welcome to Excel Eyecare Professionals in Buffalo Grove

Excel Eyecare Professionals is a full-service eyecare office located in Buffalo Grove, Illinois. We have one of the best optometrists in the area, Dr. Leon Kubicki, providing comprehensive eye exams in Buffalo Grove for over a decade.

In a world where a model of high-volume exams and shortcuts are the norm, Excel Eyecare Professionals continues to focus on the most comprehensive ocular care with the highest quality service.

We Make Eye Care Easy & Convenient

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STEP 1:

Schedule an Appointment

Request appointment online or give us a call at 847-478-9091 to book your appointment today!

STEP 2:

Your Eye Health Exam

We treat our patients as we want to be treated, like family, and we’ll take the time to get to know you and your eyes.

eye exam equipment
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STEP 3:

Live Confidently

Whether you need corrective lenses or not, live with the confidence of healthy eyes and great vision.

5 Stars from Our Patients

Comprehensive Eye Exams

Eye Exams For the Whole Family

Eye Exam for patients of all ages

Routine eye exams are important, regardless of your age or physical health. During a complete eye exam, your eye doctor will not only determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, but will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health.

Need an Eye Exam to Update Your Prescription?

A comprehensive eye exam includes a number of tests and procedures to examine and evaluate the health of your eyes and the quality of your vision. These tests range from simple ones, like having you read an eye chart, to complex tests, such as using digital retinal imaging technology to evaluate retinal health.

Eye care experts recommend you have a complete eye exam every year to assess your risk for potentially damaging eye conditions, as well as to keep on top of any changes in vision you may be experiencing.

Eye Care for Everyone

How Often Do You Need to See the Optometrist, Based on Age?

The AOA recommends an annual eye exam for any patient who wears eyeglasses or contacts. If you don’t normally need vision correction, you still need an eye exam every year. Doctors often recommend more frequent eye examinations for people with diabetes, high blood pressure and other disorders, because many diseases can have an impact on vision and eye health.

Since the risk of eye disease continues to increase with advancing age, everyone over the age of 60 should be examined annually.

If you are over 40, it’s a good idea to have your eyes examined every one to two years to check for common age-related eye problems such as presbyopia, cataracts and macular degeneration.

Eye Exams for Children

Some experts estimate that approximately 5% to 10% of pre-schoolers and 25% of school-aged children have vision problems. According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), all children should have their eyes examined at 6 months of age, at age 3 and again at the start of school. Children without vision problems or risk factors for eye or vision problems should then continue to have their eyes examined at every year throughout school.

Children with existing vision problems or risk factors should have their eyes examined more frequently. Common risk factors for vision problems include:

  • premature birth
  • developmental delays
  • turned or crossed eyes
  • family history of eye disease
  • history of eye injury
  • other physical illness or disease

The AOA recommends that children who wear eyeglasses or contact lenses should have their eyes examined at least every 12 months or according to their optometrist’s instructions. Read more about Pediatric Eye Exams.

Schedule an Eye Doctor’s Appointment

Contact our eye care clinic to schedule an eye exam near you, today.

1133 McHenry Rd #108
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089

At the corner of Arlington Heights Rd and McHenry Rd.

Forms of Payment

We Accept:

  • visa
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  • cash
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  • americanexpress
Hours
  • 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM
  • 10:00 AM - 6:30 PM
  • Closed
  • 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
  • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
  • 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM
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Our Eye Care Practice in Buffalo Grove

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With an office in Buffalo Grove our eye doctor at Excel Eyecare Professionals has been providing Buffalo Grove with quality eye care for many years.

Our state-of-the-art office features 2 exam lanes, a pre-testing area, a full service optical, waiting room, contact lens training facility, a frame repair/adjustment lab and much more.

Call us to make an appointment with our optometrist to talk about your eyeglasses, contact lenses or specialty lens needs. Drop in anytime to browse through our large selection of designer eyeglass frames and sunglasses!

Have An Eye Care Emergency?

Please call our office at: 847-478-9091. If you experience loss of vision, double vision, swelling, infection or any eye emergency, contact us immediately for guidance. We’ll help you with the best treatment to prevent complications and promote long-lasting clear eyesight.

Use your best judgment on urgency – find the nearest emergency room or review our emergency page for tips.

Wondering about payment plans? Check Out Our Insurance Plans.

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Astigmatism

Girl Abstract Colorful Hair. Astigmatism causes blurry vision and can make driving and other tasks difficult

Astigmatism: Causes and Symptoms

Astigmatism is a very common eye condition that’s easily corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses and on some occasions, surgery.

Astigmatism is caused when your eye is not completely round. Because our bodies are not perfect, astigmatism occurs in nearly everybody to some degree but for some, not to the degree that it causes blurring. Your eye is naturally shaped like a sphere. Under normal circumstances, when light enters the eye, it bends evenly, creating a clear picture on the back of your eye. In a person with astigmatism, their eye is shaped more like a football and light entering the eye is bent more in one direction than the other. This causes only part of the picture to be in focus at any given time. Objects at any distance can appear blurry and wavy. For vision problems due to astigmatism, glasses or contact lenses, and sometimes even vision correction surgery are all possible treatments.

People with undetected astigmatism often have blurred vision which can be associated with fatigue and eyestrain. While these symptoms may not necessarily be the result of astigmatism, you should schedule an eye exam if you are experiencing one or more symptoms.

Our Eye Doctors Know Astigmatism!

Our eye doctors can diagnose astigmatism with a thorough eye exam. Astigmatism may occur in combination with other vision problems such as nearsightedness and farsightedness, or even dry eyes. Because astigmatism gets worse over times, visit our eye doctor whenever you notice changes in your vision.