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Eye Doctor Buffalo Grove

Healthy Aging Month

It’s no secret that each year we grow older! September is Healthy Aging Month, an inspiration for those over the age of 45 to improve their physical, mental, and social well beings as a way to get the most enjoyment out of life. In this article, we will discuss the importance of getting regular comprehensive eye exams and general tips to keep your eyes healthy.

When we age, our eyes and vision gradually begin to weaken. This usually means wearing glasses or using brighter lights to see better and avoid accidents. Beyond short-term measures, it is essential to get regular comprehensive eye exams to screen for age-related eye diseases. One should see an optometrist at age 40 to develop an eye health benchmark, which tracks any eye or vision changes in the future. Those with diabetes or a family history of eye disease should receive an eye exam at least once a year. Many eye diseases are asymptomatic until the late stages of the disease. Getting regular comprehensive eye exams is the best way to detect eye disease. Early discovery of eye disease will ensure better treatment outcomes, as vision loss is permanent.

Some common age-related eye diseases include:

  • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) – AMD is an eye disease that can blur your central vision. AMD happens when your macula, the part of the eye responsible for straight-ahead vision, is damaged due to aging.
  • Diabetic retinopathy – Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease that causes vision loss and blindness in people with diabetes. Vision loss is caused by damage to the blood vessels in the retina.
  • Cataracts – A cataract is a cloudy area in the lens of your eye. Most cataracts develop with age, but they can also occur due to other reasons, such as eye injury or surgery.
  • Glaucoma – Glaucoma is a family of eye diseases that can cause blindness due to damage to the optical nerve. The damage is caused by a buildup of pressure in the eye.
  • Dry eye – Dry eye occurs when your eyes either do not produce enough tears or there is a problem with tear production. The risk of dry eye increases as you age.
  • Low vision – Low vision refers to a vision problem that interferes with everyday activities, such as reading, driving, or recognizing other people’s faces.

Besides receiving regular comprehensive eye exams, there are other lifestyle choices one should make to ensure their eyes remain healthy. Some of these choices include:

  • Not smoking – Current and former smokers have a much greater chance of developing age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness.
  • Maintain a healthy weight – Putting on extra weight increases the chances of developing cataracts, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration.
  • Using sunglasses – Exposure to ultraviolet light increases the chances of developing cataracts and macular degeneration.
  • Be physically active – Those that participate in regular physical activity experienced less vision loss than those who weren’t physically active.

Children’s Eye Health & Safety Month

With summer coming to an end, it’s time for parents to start getting their back-to-school plans together. Most parents intuitively know getting ready for the new school year means purchasing new backpacks, notebooks, clothes, and other school supplies, but are your child’s eyes prepared for another year of learning? August is Children’s Eye Health Month, a reminder for parents to schedule regular comprehensive eye exams for their children to ensure their child’s eyes are both healthy and ready to partake in learning. We will explore the benefits of regular comprehensive eye exams for children, vision problems to look out for, and safety tips for protecting children’s eyes from injury.

Eye exams for children ensure they can learn without visual interference. An optometrist can detect common eye issues in children like nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism, as well as serious eye issues like color blindness, lazy eye, drooping eyelid, and crossed eyes. A child should receive their first eye exams at six months, age 3, and before entering the first grade. Regular eye exams are essential for children, as untreated eye conditions can worsen and become difficult to treat.

Good eyesight is instrumental for children’s learning and development. Unfortunately, many children do not realize they have a vision problem. Undetected vision problems can lead to learning issues and behavioral problems in children. Here are some signs to look out for to ensure your child isn’t suffering from a vision problem.

  • Squinting, eye rubbing, or tilting the head while reading the whiteboard.
  • Holding a book too close to their face or consistent use of their finger when reading.
  • Excessive tearing, light sensitivity, wandering eyes, and digital eye strain when using digital devices.

A crucial component of school besides learning is partaking in sports and other recreational activities. Unfortunately, thousands of children will suffer related eye injuries due to physical activities. Here are some helpful tips to ensure your child does not suffer an accidental eye injury.

  • Children should wear suitable eye protection when playing sports or partaking in other recreational activities.
  • Children should only play with age-appropriate toys and avoid ones with sharp protruding components or fire projectiles.
  • One should store cleaning supplies, sprays, and other household chemicals away from children.

BluTech Lenses

Benefits of BluTech Lenses

We Carry BluTech Lenses

They are designed to enhance your comfort, vision, and eye safety during work and play. High Energy Visible (HEV) Blue light exists outside from natural sunlight as well as indoors – emitted from digital devices and compact fluorescent lights.

BluTech Lenses Are Perfect For:

  • People who spend over 3 hours a day staring at a computer or digital device
  • Driving during the day or at night
  • Golfing, fishing, baseball, and outdoor sports enthusiasts
  • Online gaming enthusiasts
  • Children involved in sports or computers
  • Anyone who wants to protect their eyes and vision from the harmful effects of blue light.

Studies show that blue light can impair our vision and our overall health, linking it to digital eye strain, retina damage, worsening symptoms of eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration, and disruption in sleep patterns. Avoiding HEV exposure is easy with BluTech. BluTech lenses provide maximum protection and enhanced performance for indoor and outdoor settings, by naturally filtering the high energy wavelengths that are the most damaging to your eyes and your health.

The Benefits of BluTech lenses include:

  • Reduced Glare
  • Crisper Acuity
  • Improved Contrast
  • High Impact Lens Material
  • Lightweight and Comfortable
  • Enhanced Performance

With the rise of electronic devices, your eyes are now exposed to increasing levels of harmful light spectrums. BluTech Lenses protect your eyes from the dangers of ofUV rays and harmful, high-energy blue light for a lifetime of vision preservation and performance. Everyone interested in benefiting from lifelong healthy vision, especially those at high-risk of macular degeneration, should wear BluTech Lenses. Learn more about the Management of Ocular Diseases.

BluTech uses a proprietary formulation offering more complete near-clear blue light protection

Whether it’s a phone, IPad, laptop, ATM or gas pump… they all go dark when viewed with ordinary polarized sunglasses. Not anymore. BluTech combines a polarizer with natural pigments and dyes to ensure that whatever device your are viewing outside is, well… readable.Get Glare Protection AND Readability OutdoorsPolarized sunglasses aren’t much help when reading a digital device outdoors. In fact, they make things worse. UNTIL NOW. BluTech Polarized solves the readability challenge. It combines a polarizing film to protect you from glare with natural pigmentsand dyes to make any device readable outdoors. SMART

 

BluTech, the gold standard for blue light protection, introduces BluTech ULTRA. It features blue Light Plus™ — a proprietary formulation offering more complete near-clear blue light protection.

BluTech Ultra At-A-Glance

  • Lighter, constant density color, regardless of prescription
  • Protection encapsulated in the lens, won’t scratch or wear off
  • Polycarbonate – lightweight, impact-resistant, and 100% UV protection
  • Plano, single vision, and progressive

BluTech MAX At-A-Glance

BluTech MAX offers the highest level of blue light filtration of any lens in our collection. It features Blue Light Plus™ — a proprietary formulation offering a more complete near-clear blue light protection.

Ideal Candidates for Bluetech Max

  • Emmetropic children and adult contact lens wearers
  • Adults at risk for macular-related issues
  • Post-cataract and Lasik patients

 

FogBlocker

ExcelEycare BlueLightWebtile

If you wear glasses and a face mask, you’ve probably struggled with “mask fog.” Your lenses get all misty, requiring you to wipe your eyewear throughout the day. Below are a few strategies to help you prevent your eyeglasses from fogging up when wearing a mask.

But First, Why Do Glasses Fog Up?

Quite simply, condensation forms whenever moist warm air hits a cool surface. Your specs fog up when the mask directs your warm breath upward instead of in front of you — which is great for preventing virus transmission but bad for anyone with less-than-stellar eyesight.

Is Your Mask Well Fitted?

The mask should fit securely over your nose. Ideally, you’ll want to wear a mask with a nose bridge or one that can be shaped or molded to your face. When the mask fits properly, hopefully most of your breath will go through it, not out the top or sides.

Use Your Glasses to Seal the Top of Your Mask

This method works best with large, thick eyewear frames. By pulling your mask up higher on your nose and placing the lower part of your eyeglasses on the mask, you can get a snug fit that blocks your warm breath from escaping upward toward your eyewear.

Tape Your Mask to Your Face

You can always use tape to secure your mask across the bridge of your nose and the top of your cheeks. Use easy-to-remove tape, including adhesive, medical, or athletic. Just be sure to stay away from duct tape.

NOW AVAILABLE: Anti-Fog Wet Wipes & Dry Cloths

Now at Excel Eye Care, we carry both One-Time Use Wet Wipes & Reusable Dry Cloths to prevent foggy lenses!

There are ordinary fog wipes and then there is patent-pending FogBlocker. This revolutionary new product designed by biotech scientists is a game-changer compared to the most popular anti-fog solutions. A FogBlocker dry wipe can be used well over 500 times and lasts between 48-72 hrs per wipe! Its ultrafine microfiber cloth can be safely used on any lenses including those that are coated. You can even apply it to all your PPE plastic guards and goggles.

FogBlocker wet wipes work instantly on most lenses including those that have coatings. It comes in a package of 30 and is a single-use anti-fog wipe and lens cleaner. It’s easy to use, fast-drying and one coat lasts up to 48hrs! The wipe also cleans dirt, grease, and does not smear. Simply wipe and dispose. It’s perfect for those people on the go!

Ask about our FogBlocker solutions at your next appointment!

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COVID Protocols

Our top priority is the health and safety of our patients, employees & families. We are taking the proper precautions in office to ensure that we can service all of your eye care needs in an effective & safe way. We appreciate your cooperation during this time!

Our updated policies & procedures:

1) Issuance of protective masks and gloves for team members as well as doctors. To abide by ordinances set in place by the city of Buffalo Grove, all patients are required to wear masks to enter our office.

2) Limiting patient traffic to enhance physical distancing.

3) Keeping front door and door to optical open to eliminate door handle contact.

4) Requesting that patients with symptoms of illness, and those at higher likelihood of exposure to corona virus, postpone their visit.

5) Limiting any patient companion to a parent, guardian or caretaker. Others should be encouraged to wait in the hallway or in the car.

6) Screening forehead temperatures using non-contact thermometers and sending home patients with any readings 100.4 degrees or higher.

7) Increased disinfection of surfaces and all exam equipment.

8) Installing protective face shields on exam equipment.

9) Maximizing in office social distancing whenever possible.

10) Cleaning and disinfecting ophthalmic frames after handling.

Comprehensive Eye Exams

Eye Exams For the Whole Family

Eye Exam for patients of all ages

Routine eye exams are important, regardless of your age or physical health. During a complete eye exam, your eye doctor will not only determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, but will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health.

Need an Eye Exam to Update Your Prescription?

A comprehensive eye exam includes a number of tests and procedures to examine and evaluate the health of your eyes and the quality of your vision. These tests range from simple ones, like having you read an eye chart, to complex tests, such as using digital retinal imaging technology to evaluate retinal health.

Eye care experts recommend you have a complete eye exam every year to assess your risk for potentially damaging eye conditions, as well as to keep on top of any changes in vision you may be experiencing.

Eye Care for Everyone

How Often Do You Need to See the Optometrist, Based on Age?

The AOA recommends an annual eye exam for any patient who wears eyeglasses or contacts. If you don’t normally need vision correction, you still need an eye exam every year. Doctors often recommend more frequent eye examinations for people with diabetes, high blood pressure and other disorders, because many diseases can have an impact on vision and eye health.

Since the risk of eye disease continues to increase with advancing age, everyone over the age of 60 should be examined annually.

If you are over 40, it’s a good idea to have your eyes examined every one to two years to check for common age-related eye problems such as presbyopia, cataracts and macular degeneration.

Eye Exams for Children

Some experts estimate that approximately 5% to 10% of pre-schoolers and 25% of school-aged children have vision problems. According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), all children should have their eyes examined at 6 months of age, at age 3 and again at the start of school. Children without vision problems or risk factors for eye or vision problems should then continue to have their eyes examined at every year throughout school.

Children with existing vision problems or risk factors should have their eyes examined more frequently. Common risk factors for vision problems include:

  • premature birth
  • developmental delays
  • turned or crossed eyes
  • family history of eye disease
  • history of eye injury
  • other physical illness or disease

The AOA recommends that children who wear eyeglasses or contact lenses should have their eyes examined at least every 12 months or according to their optometrist’s instructions. Read more about Pediatric Eye Exams.

Schedule an Eye Doctor’s Appointment

Contact our eye care clinic to schedule an eye exam near you, today.

What to Expect

Preparing for Your Eye Exam In Buffalo Grove

Person wearing glasses reading before an eye doctor's appointment

You might be going to a regularly-scheduled eye exam. You may be following a recommendation to see an optometrist after a vision screening at a local clinic or wellness center. Or your next eye doctor visit could be a response to vision problems or eye discomfort.

The more you know going in, the easier the entire vision care process will be.

For regularly scheduled eye exams, expect to talk about any changes in your medical history since the last time you saw your eye doctor. And if this is your first time in a new practice, you’ll be asked to provide a more complete medical history, including a list of medications you’re currently taking, and any vision problems your parents may have experienced.

In addition, you’ll undergo a series of vision and eye tests that help determine the overall health and quality of your vision. These tests also help to check that your current prescription glasses or contacts (if you have one) is still meeting your vision needs. Your optometrist will also check your eyes for signs of any potential vision problems or eye diseases. In many instances, your pupil may be dilated (opened) using special drops so that your eye doctor can better see the structures of the eye.

You’ll then have an honest discussion about the current state of your eye health and vision, and your eye doctor may prescribe vision correction for you in the form of eyeglasses or contact lenses. Any health concerns or possibly serious vision complications will also be discussed, including the next steps you must take to preserve and protect your sight.

How Long Is an Eye Exam?

In general, a routine eye exam will last less than an hour depending upon the number of tests you have, and may be partially or completely covered by many vision insurance plans.

Visiting eye doctors as a result of a vision screening is also common, but remember: vision screenings offered by health clinics, pediatricians, public schools or local charitable organizations are not a substitute for comprehensive eye exams. Be sure to bring the findings from your screening to your eye doctor—it’s a great way to begin the discussion of your current eye health.

For eye doctor visits that result from eye pain, eye discomfort or vision problems you actually can see, expect to take many of the steps involved in a routine eye exam, but specific to the symptoms you’re having. There may be a number of additional tests required as well, so it’s important—especially when suffering pain or discomfort—to allow for as much time as possible for a complete, comprehensive eye exam.

And if you feel you are in an emergency situation with your eyes or your vision—don’t wait. Seek immediate emergency medical treatment.

What to Remember For Your Eye Exam

Many vision problems and eye diseases often present minimal, if any, symptoms. That’s why it’s so important to make regular appointments to see your eye doctor. And since vision can change gradually over time, it’s important to know that you’re seeing your best, year after year.

Remember the following for your next eye exam:

  • Know your medical history and list of current medications
  • Know your current symptoms and be able to describe them—write them down if necessary
  • Know your family history—some eye diseases like glaucoma and cataracts are hereditary
  • Ask in advance about your particular vision insurance plan, and if a co-pay will be due
  • Bring your insurance card, identification and method of payment, if necessary
  • Bring your most recent prescription for glasses or contact lenses
  • Bring your corrective eyewear to the exam
  • If undergoing a test using dilation eye drops, bring proper eye protection, like sunglasses, for after your appointment

Most importantly, remember that eye doctors — and everyone within the eye care practice — are there to help you see your best and feel your best.

Special thanks to the EyeGlasses Guide, for information material that aided in the creation of this website.

You can contact our office at your convenience to schedule your next eye doctor’s appointment.